Inteliscope: iPhone Gun Sight

It was bound to happen. We have iPhone applications that prevent drunk dialing ex-girlfriends to virtual tape measures, so what took so long for someone to develop a “tactical scope” app?

For you insatiable iPhone junkies, wait is over!

The new Inteliscope system allows you to mount your iPhone 4/4s or 5 to any firearm equipped with a 1913 rail and use it as a sight. Not only can it be used as a sight, but it can also record a video of your exploits with the push of a virtual button. Of course it can be used on non-firearms that feature 1913 rails such as paintball guns and airsoft guns as well.

Inteliscope Steyr AUG

The plastic $99 hardware kit for mounting your iPhone to a rifle isn’t very robust given the price tag.

The company promotes the system as a serious tool, but in a somewhat tongue in cheek manner. I think. I hope.

Maybe they really do feel it’s the “premium tactical accessory for Apple mobile devices” that is “designed to enable maximum tactical use of your iPhone’s capabilities”. What I can tell you is that it’s not a serious tool at all, but instead is a rather pricey novelty item with limited tactical value.

You can download the Inteliscope application from the App Store for free, however if you want to mount your iPhone to your rifle you will need to purchase the $99 mounting kit from the Inteliscope wesbite. The kit features a mostly plastic mounting bracket that clamps to your 1913 rail via a simple plastic throw-lever. My kit came with (3) different phone cases that house either the iPhone 4, 4S or 5. This isn’t a serious mount intended for field use, folks. One drop from shoulder height and you’ll turn your tactical iPhone accessory into a collection of plastic bits and pieces.

I recommend downloading the free app before investing $99 into the iPhone mount to get a feel for it.

The application is user configurable with four different reticle types and colors. You can also define custom profiles for different firearms, or pick one of the predefined profiles which range from a Nerf gun to an AR15. If you choose to crate your own profile, you can specify the firearm, zero range, ammunition, ballistic coefficient, muzzle velocity and ballistic profile (G1, G2, etc.). Why the need for the ballistic data, you may ask? Because the system includes a simple bullet drop compensator to accompany the 5x zoom making long range work a snap… well, not really. You can take pot shots at distant targets but don’t expect anything remotely approaching match accuracy from this rather toyish get’up. You may also zero the sight using .8″ increments at 100 yards.

One of the only semi-practical features of the Inteliscope is the ability to record video while shooting your rifle. The video won’t include any of the stuff you see on the screen such as the GPS coords, reticle or firearm used — all you will see is the raw video as if you had recorded it using the iOS video app. Since the iPhone has a fairly wide angle lens, don’t expect to see much detail past a few yards.

Inteliscope sight picture

This is the “sight picture” the operator will see when shooting with the Inteliscope system.

Other features include the ability to use the phone’s light, set an onscreen stopwatch timer, display your GPS coords, display the rifle profile selected and a few other do-dads of dubious tactical value.

I found shooting with the Inteliscope to be a bit challenging. Thanks to father time, my near vision is a total wreck. Trying to focus on the small screen sitting 9″ from my face doesn’t work well for me. Someone with younger eyes would probably find the arrangement a bit more comfortable. I also discovered that using any reticle other than the simple dot was extremely annoying. The application uses the iPhone’s positional sensors to adjust the reticle for cant. If you move the rifle around or slightly move it from side-to-side, the reticle will wobble around constantly trying to orient itself to the horizon. I’ve not found a way to lock the reticle in place, so I stuck with using the dot reticle to avoid giving myself a headache.

If you’re an iPhone junkie, and you don’t mind spending $99 for a tacticool toy to impress your friends, you might be interested in the Inteliscope. Don’t expect it to revolutionize your YouTube channel with high quality gun camera footage or to perform as a serious weapons sight, it’s none of the above. But for the iPhone equipped gun nut who has everything, you might consider this novelty as a stocking stuffer for Christmas.

MAC

MAC is an avid shooter, former MCSF Marine, NRA member, Oath Keeper and is commissioned as a Colonel by the Governor of Kentucky. Known for his videos on the Military Arms Channel, he also writes for The Bang Switch, for Shotgun News (Be Ready!) and freelances for Guns & Ammo. MAC has been a life long shooter who has an interest in all things that go "bang" but gravitates towards military type firearms.

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23 thoughts on “Inteliscope: iPhone Gun Sight

    • If you have a 3d printer i think you have the money for a piece of plastic! haha

      • The point is, with a 3D printer, he can design and make a much more robust mount for the iPhone! I like this idea, and have a 4S. If you can make a better mount, I’d be interested in buying one from you. Hopefully, much cheaper than the $99 one.

  1. “airsoft” not “soft air” (unless that was intentional)

    You could always use duct tape and some pieces of cardboard to mount it to your rifle…

  2. The only way I would use this is with an airsoft or paintball gun. Just thinking the iPhone was never rated for the shock of recoil.

    • I don’t think an iPhone would have an issue on lighter recoiling weapons like an AR. There aren’t any moving parts (except for some small ones in the camera), and thus less that is easily damageable. Just consider: you can drop an iPhone on a hard surface and it still works without any issues. That’s a lot of G force it’s going through.

      • I think it would handle AR-grade recoil just find. If there were some way to incorporate the onboard accelerometer… somebody better than I am at it could maybe come up with something.

  3. Well, combine this with the 120×120 thermal imaging camera that was demoed earlier this year for the iphone and maybe you could have something cool-ish.

    • Someone who understands! PCMan, Latency is the delay between the optic and shooter inputs as well as your targets actions, much like playing multiplayer online on a lagging connection, except add in natural respiratory pause, sight picture before during and after… It’s a novelty.

      • Considering the small delay between the camera and reality, I don’t see it being a problem for any of the uses that one would actually use this for. Plinking, slow target shooting, maybe even 3 gun should all be fine. And yes, I know what latency is =P I am a software engineer after all.

  4. And it wasn’t a pricey novelty, its actually $69.99 with the software available thru ITunes for free. Its not something that anyone is going to use in battle, but for the everyday hunter or gun enthusiast it is quite a gadget to at least give you some perspective on how you shoot. It has a recording feature that allows you to capture your range time and maybe offer some solutions as to your shooting patterns. It certainly offers more value than some of the red dot or inexpensive scopes on the market that are not worth the money you spend on them!!

  5. Well I sure hope that no one breaks into your house when you have a dead battery. Itll be a bitch to try and use cover when your tethered to the wall with that stupid little 3′ cord…

    Ridiculous

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  7. The mounting bracket is garbage. should have been made of aluminum or high quality impact resistant plastic…..

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